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ROALD DAHL 100 CELEBRATORY BLOG TOUR – 10 Facts You Didn’t Know About Roald Dahl
September 11th, 2016 by Liza Wiemer

RD

ROALD DAHL 100 CELEBRATORY BLOG TOUR

Charlie and the Glass ElevatorCHARLIE

AND THE

GREAT GLASS ELEVATOR:

10 Facts You Didn’t Know About Roald Dahl

 

  1. How do you pronounce Roald?

Roo-all. The ‘d’ is silent.

  1. Roald Dahl loves bananas mashed up with…olive oil!

Roald loved making a treat that he learned about from his own mother. He would take a banana and mash it up with a few drops of olive oil. The olive oil heightens the flavor of the banana and turns it into a delicious syrupy paste.

  1. Roald Dahl served in the Royal Air Force during WWII.

When he was first flying in Africa, Roald Dahl wrote to his mother telling her how lucky he felt to be flying. But Roald Dahl nearly lost his life when his plane crashed in the Libyan desert and burst into flames. He managed to drag himself out before the plane blew up and he sustained a fractured skull and temporary blindness.

  1. Roald Dahl often acted out his characters for his children.

When his children were falling asleep, Roald Dahl would climb up the ladder and stand next to their windows. Then, he’d push a bamboo cane through and act as the BFG, the Big Friendly Giant.

  1. Dinner guests of Roald Dahl always received an after-meal chocolate set.

After dinner, guests were offered a red plastic box made up of all Roald Dahl’s favorite candies: Twix, Kit Kats, Rolos, Smarties, Flakes, and Maltesers

In an essay for ROALD DAHL’S COOKBOOK, Roald Dahl wrote a history of the great chocolate bars, waxing lyrical about the “seven miraculous years” between 1930 and 1937 when the greatest chocolates—including Mars, Kit Kat, Aero, Maltesers, Rolo and Smarties—were invented.

  1. Dahl’s dog, Chopper, regularly enjoyed a tastier dinner than most of us do.

The beloved brown and white Jack Russell Terrier was fed oysters, caviar, Smarties, and sometimes dog food. Chopper was the last dog that Roald Dahl owned and the pair even appeared on TV together. Chopper lived to the ripe old age of sixteen.

  1. Roald Dahl helped invent an important medical device.

In 1960, the carriage carrying Roald Dahl’s son, Theo (just four months old) was hit by a cab on the corner of a New York street and crushed against the side of a bus. Theo underwent several operations to drain fluid from his head. However, the valve used to drain the fluid kept blocking and clogging. With Theo’s life at stake, Roald joined forces with Stanley Wade (a toymaker, who specialized in model aeroplane engines) and Kenneth Till (a pioneering pediatric neurosurgeon). Together, they created the Dahl-Wade-Till valve, which not only saved Theo’s life, but also those of almost three thousand children affected by similar conditions worldwide.

  1. Roald Dahl loved to mix potions.

Roald Dahl mixed amazing bedtime drinks for his children and called them “witches potions.” They contained ingredients such as canned peaches blended with milk and pink, blue or green food coloring.

  1. Mushroom-picking was one of Roald Dahl’s hobbies in later life.

He loved to go out early in the morning with his dog Chopper for company, to gather mushrooms hidden in the local field. 

  1. Roald’s writing was criticized by teachers as a child and as an adult.

When he was in school, Roald was considered a terrible writer by his teachers. One teacher described Roald as being “quite incapable of marshalling his thoughts on paper.” Later, when he wrote a story for his daughter Lucy to hand in as part of her English homework, the paper received a “C–you could do better.”

For more fun facts about Roald Dahl check out:

D is for Dahl: A gloriumptious A-Z guide to the world of Roald Dahl Compiled by Wendy Cooling; Illustrations by Quentin Blake

Puffin Books; $5.99; Available now!

About Roald Dahl:

Roald Dahl (1916-1990) was born in Wales of Norwegian parents. In 1951, Roald Dahl met his future wife, the American actress Patricia Neal, who starred in films including The Day the Earth Stood Still, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and Hud, for which she won an Oscar. After establishing himself as a writer for adults, Roald Dahl began writing children’s stories in 1960 and wrote two of his best-known novels, James and the Giant Peach and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory in the U.S.

In September 1964, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was published initially in the U.S. with the U.K. following a few years later. It would go on to become one of the most famous and best-known of Roald’s stories. The idea for the story grew out of his own well-documented love of chocolate and his school-day memories of acting as a taster for a famous chocolate factory. These first stories were written as entertainment for his own children, to whom many of his books are dedicated.

Today, Roald Dahl’s stories are available in 58 languages and have sold more than 200 million books. With more than 40 million Roald Dahl books in print in the U.S. alone, Dahl is considered one of the most beloved storytellers of our time and his popularity continues to increase as his fantastic novels, including James and the Giant Peach, Matilda, The BFG, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, delight an ever-growing legion of fans.

 

  • For more information please visit roalddahl.com/usa
  • Facebook.com/RoaldDahl
  • Twitter.com/roald_dahl * Don’t forget to hashtag #roalddahl100
  • YouTube.com/officialroalddahl
  • Pinterest.com/roalddahl
  • Instagram: @roald_dahl * Don’t forget to hashtag #roalddahl100

Roald Dahl 100

Entitled Roald Dahl 100, 2016 marks 100 years since the birth of Roald Dahl—the world’s number one storyteller. There will be celebrations for Roald Dahl 100 throughout 2016, delivering a year packed with gloriumptious treats and surprises for everyone.

Roald Dahl said, “If you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.”

The Roald Dahl Literary Estate believes in doing good things. That’s why ten percent of all Roald Dahl income* goes to our charity partners. We have supported causes including: specialist children’s nurses, grants for families in need, and educational outreach programs.

The Roald Dahl Charitable Trust is a registered UK charity (no. 1119330).

* All author payments and royalty income net of third party commissions.

GIVEAWAY:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Partners in Health

A percentage of proceeds from some of the Roald Dahl 100 events planned for this September will be donated to Partners in Health, a charity co-founded by Ophelia Dahl, Roald Dahl’s daughter. Partners in Health works in partnership with local governments and health providers to bring high-quality health care to poor communities in ten countries.

PIH believes that health is a human right and that a person’s ability to pay for treatment should not determine their access to health care. For nearly 30 years, PIH has shaped discourse among global health policymakers and proven what is possible in making health care accessible to all people.

PIH trains local health workers, nurses, and doctors in order to raise the standard of care for poor people. In partnership with the world’s leading medical and academic institutions, PIH aims to build workforces of local health professionals to strengthen and sustain public health systems.

Our achievements are based on our philosophy of accompaniment. To us this means working beside and learning from people in the countries where we work. We share experiences and goals, partnering to bring care where it is needed most.

For more information, visit www.pih.org.

 

Penguin Young Readers

Penguin Young Readers is one of the leading children’s book publishers in the United States. The company owns a wide range of imprints and trademarks including Dial Books, Dutton, Grosset & Dunlap, Philomel, Puffin, Speak, Firebird, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, Viking, Razorbill, and Frederick Warne. These imprints are home to such award-winning, New York Times- bestselling authors as Laurie Halse Anderson, Jay Asher, Judy Blume, Jan Brett, Eric Carle, Ally Condie, Roald Dahl, Tomie dePaola, Sarah Dessen, Anna Dewdney, John Flanagan, Gayle Forman John Green, Oliver Jeffers, Mike Lupica, Richelle Mead, B.J. Novak, Richard Peck, Judy Schachner, Jacqueline Woodson and dozens of other popular authors. Penguin Young Readers Group is also the proud publisher of perennial brand franchises such as The Little Engine That Could, the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys series, Peter Rabbit, Spot, the Classic Winnie the Pooh, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Strega Nona, Madeline, Mad Libs, Alex Rider, the Rangers Apprentice, Skippyjon Jones, Flower Fairies, and Pippi Longstocking, among many others. Penguin Young Readers Group is a division of Penguin Group LLC, a Penguin Random House company.

 

 


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